21 1 / 2013

 There weren’t many jobs going around on January 20, 1992, when this cartoon came out, but those people who were being interviewed for whatever positions were open were facing an increasing number of ridiculous questions and tests. If anything, of course, things have gotten even more out of control now, when employers find it completely reasonable to run credit checks on their employees, even for jobs that pay hardly anything and have almost no responsibility.

 There weren’t many jobs going around on January 20, 1992, when this cartoon came out, but those people who were being interviewed for whatever positions were open were facing an increasing number of ridiculous questions and tests. If anything, of course, things have gotten even more out of control now, when employers find it completely reasonable to run credit checks on their employees, even for jobs that pay hardly anything and have almost no responsibility.

21 1 / 2013

 January 17, 1992: Mark Twain said that history didn’t repeat, that it rhymed, and nowhere is that more true than in American politics. Whether we’re talking about a Clinton versus Bush rematch in 2016 or just candidates who stylistically tried to mimic previous winners – Mitt Romney channeling Ronald Reagan – there’s never anything new.

 January 17, 1992: Mark Twain said that history didn’t repeat, that it rhymed, and nowhere is that more true than in American politics. Whether we’re talking about a Clinton versus Bush rematch in 2016 or just candidates who stylistically tried to mimic previous winners – Mitt Romney channeling Ronald Reagan – there’s never anything new.

21 1 / 2013

 January 15, 1992: I did this cartoon after hearing about those videos of a log burning in a fireplace. Just thought it was a fascinating idea, substituting vacuous digital entertainment for an infinitely more satisfying real-world experience. Being that I am an editorial cartoonist, I segued into a punchline about underemployment.

 January 15, 1992: I did this cartoon after hearing about those videos of a log burning in a fireplace. Just thought it was a fascinating idea, substituting vacuous digital entertainment for an infinitely more satisfying real-world experience. Being that I am an editorial cartoonist, I segued into a punchline about underemployment.

21 1 / 2013

 January 10, 1992: there was a lot of talk at this time about the end of the Cold War, how we were going to enjoy a peace dividend, how now that the United States didn’t have any major new enemies, we would redirect our resources and attention to the home front, rebuild our infrastructure, get rid of poverty, etc. Seems so long ago, doesn’t it? This cartoon was about the CIA, which was then deemed to be waning in influence. I strongly suspected that the spooks would never really go away.

 January 10, 1992: there was a lot of talk at this time about the end of the Cold War, how we were going to enjoy a peace dividend, how now that the United States didn’t have any major new enemies, we would redirect our resources and attention to the home front, rebuild our infrastructure, get rid of poverty, etc. Seems so long ago, doesn’t it? This cartoon was about the CIA, which was then deemed to be waning in influence. I strongly suspected that the spooks would never really go away.

10 1 / 2013

This cartoon from January 6, 1992 talks about the adventure something that has now become common, the replacement of old-fashioned  food stamps with electronic benefit cards issued by the United States government. The general point, of course, is that capitalism requires systemic long-term poverty in order to continue.

This cartoon from January 6, 1992 talks about the adventure something that has now become common, the replacement of old-fashioned  food stamps with electronic benefit cards issued by the United States government. The general point, of course, is that capitalism requires systemic long-term poverty in order to continue.

10 1 / 2013

By early 1990 the AIDS crisis had been greatly mitigated by the wider distribution of drugs that allowed people to live indefinitely with an HIV infection. This opens the space for snotty cartoonists like me to make jokes that riffed upon the human condition using AIDS as a jumping point. This particular cartoon responded to a trope that showed up in a lot of interviews of HIV victims, in which – like many people facing potentially terminal diseases – the person afflicted talked about how much more alive they felt and how much more they valued life. Nothing wrong with that, but I always like to see the dark lining to every silver cloud.

By early 1990 the AIDS crisis had been greatly mitigated by the wider distribution of drugs that allowed people to live indefinitely with an HIV infection. This opens the space for snotty cartoonists like me to make jokes that riffed upon the human condition using AIDS as a jumping point. This particular cartoon responded to a trope that showed up in a lot of interviews of HIV victims, in which – like many people facing potentially terminal diseases – the person afflicted talked about how much more alive they felt and how much more they valued life. Nothing wrong with that, but I always like to see the dark lining to every silver cloud.

09 1 / 2013

Now this cartoon, my first of 1992, is one that I’m still quite happy with. One of my recurring themes, one that the mainstream media doesn’t seem particularly interested in, is the tendency of the corporate led society to deprofessionalize every occupation that they can and drive down wages across the board.

Now this cartoon, my first of 1992, is one that I’m still quite happy with. One of my recurring themes, one that the mainstream media doesn’t seem particularly interested in, is the tendency of the corporate led society to deprofessionalize every occupation that they can and drive down wages across the board.

09 1 / 2013

Months after the end of the Gulf War, the George HW Bush administration was already doing business with the regime of Saddam Hussein again. After all, money always trumps ideals. Not that these guys ever really had any.

Months after the end of the Gulf War, the George HW Bush administration was already doing business with the regime of Saddam Hussein again. After all, money always trumps ideals. Not that these guys ever really had any.

09 1 / 2013

Here is a dated cartoon that I wouldn’t do again. It’s kind of a stupid joke: Bush the first was so unpopular that even his dog would have been him when he came home. Just dumb. Of course, this is the sort of thing that passes for humor among most editorial cartoonists today. But that doesn’t excuse this. I was always better than that. Even back then. Hopefully I’ve learned a few things. I will say however that I did enjoy drawing my weird ass animals.

Here is a dated cartoon that I wouldn’t do again. It’s kind of a stupid joke: Bush the first was so unpopular that even his dog would have been him when he came home. Just dumb. Of course, this is the sort of thing that passes for humor among most editorial cartoonists today. But that doesn’t excuse this. I was always better than that. Even back then. Hopefully I’ve learned a few things. I will say however that I did enjoy drawing my weird ass animals.

08 1 / 2013

This cartoon ran on Christmas day 1991. At the time, student loan defaults were a growing problem. If anything, it has become an even bigger one since then.
One solution being contemplated by the government and the Republicans concerned about student loan deadbeats was to skim 10% of the paychecks of those who didn’t pay back their loans on time. As I pointed out here, you can’t really get blood out of a stone. Unemployment was very high, especially among the young, as it is today, so 10% of zero would still be zero. One thing that I would change in this cartoon if I were going to do it today would be to make it a little bit less long-winded. I think it would be better that way.

This cartoon ran on Christmas day 1991. At the time, student loan defaults were a growing problem. If anything, it has become an even bigger one since then.

One solution being contemplated by the government and the Republicans concerned about student loan deadbeats was to skim 10% of the paychecks of those who didn’t pay back their loans on time. As I pointed out here, you can’t really get blood out of a stone. Unemployment was very high, especially among the young, as it is today, so 10% of zero would still be zero. One thing that I would change in this cartoon if I were going to do it today would be to make it a little bit less long-winded. I think it would be better that way.